July 18th, 2014 | Chris Lloyd

Convergence means “there is no digital”

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“Print is not dead. Neither is television. In fact, very few technologies are actually gone. Rather, they are simply being reinvented and converging with new technologies as opposed to being replaced by them.” – Ben Malbon, Director, Creative Partnerships, Google

One of my favorite movies is The Matrix. (yep, I said it.) There’s a scene in the movie where the young prodigy tells Neo that “there is no spoon”, that he needs to only realize the truth. What is possible is limited by his understanding of boundaries.

Now, remember that scene when I say this…. “there is no digital”. Yes, there are communications technologies that use ones and zeros but really, they are just technologies. TV and Facebook exist in just one single “communication” a universe where people interact with both, often simultaneously. The separation of “digital” and “traditional” is a man made division. The two are converging and its time to expand skill sets to understand both.

Ben Malbon former Executive Director of Innovation at BBH and now with Google, eloquently explains convergence: “Print is not dead. Neither is television. In fact, very few technologies are actually gone. Rather, they are simply being reinvented and converging with new technologies as opposed to being replaced by them.”

We have positions at Hey that do this. Planning architects that grasp the full universe of possibility are able to work with creative teams to help big ideas reach business goals.

For example, Pacific Place gave us a simple business goal. Drive more foot traffic to their shopping center. Traditional media like television and radio asked users to sign up for a mobile SMS program that would deliver the very best promotion happening at Pacific Place each week. Facebook, pandora and digital video contributed as well.

Television and radio gave the program much needed reach for what ultimately was a digital engagement. The idea would not have worked without being able to pull from both worlds. Having only a digital or traditional expert focused on the campaign would have been like hiring a maestro that could only hear strings or only hear brass.

If you’re currently separating your efforts into traditional and digital we’re happy to give you a little of our perspective on what the world looks like when “there is no digital”, just send us a quick email. contactus@hey.us.com

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